Day: May 17, 2015

Cannes Film Review: ‘Journey to the Shore’

May 17, 2015

A piano teacher goes on a second honeymoon of sorts with her missing husband when he returns as a ghost in “Journey to the Shore,” Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s competent return to human drama in the vein of “Tokyo Sonata,” albeit with a spiritual dimension. Traversing East Japan from small towns to remote hamlets, the film’s winding, […]

Read More

Cannes Film Review: ‘Louder Than Bombs’

May 17, 2015

Courtesy of Cannes Film Festival In the 35 years since “Ordinary People,” American cinema has told and retold stories of how a death in the family can reveal the dysfunction no one wanted to admit was there. “Louder Than Bombs” is just such a picture, studying how a widower and his two sons cope with […]

Read More

Film Review: ‘Tomorrowland’

May 17, 2015

Courtesy of Disney In his Pixar triumphs “The Incredibles” and “Ratatouille,” writer-director Brad Bird proved himself not just a wizardly storyteller but also an ardent champion of excellence — of intelligence, creativity and nonconformity — in every arena of human (and rodent) accomplishment. All the more disappointing, then, that the forces of mediocrity have largely prevailed over […]

Read More

Cannes Film Review: ‘Green Room’

May 17, 2015

Two years after making a crimson splash in Cannes with his catgut-taut suspenser “Blue Ruin,” U.S. writer-director Jeremy Saulnier continues his grisly journey across the rainbow with the ultraviolent backwoods horror pic “Green Room.” Following a young group of punk rockers as they scrape, shoot and slash their way out of an Oregon neo-Nazi group’s […]

Read More

Cannes Film Review: ‘The High Sun’

May 17, 2015

Courtesy of Cannes Film Festival Ingrained Serbo-Croat hatreds cause ongoing pain across three decades and three storylines in Dalibor Matanic’s strongest film to date, “The High Sun.” Using the same talented actors to represent different characters in the trio of narratives, the helmer engages with love across ethnic divides, from doomed to traumatized to hesitantly […]

Read More

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Brand New Testament’

May 17, 2015

In the beginning, things went a bit differently than the Good Book would have us believe — or at least, that’s the playful conceit behind Jaco Van Dormael’s “The Brand New Testament,” an irreverent (but otherwise harmless) ontological satire that puts a cartoonish spin on the Christian origin story. Incidentally, Van Dormael has volunteered an […]

Read More

Cannes Film Review: ‘Mon roi’

May 17, 2015

Courtesy of Cannes Film Festival Sometimes the hardest thing in life is to recognize that a relationship has run its course — or more difficult still, that the match may not have been healthy in the first place. In her fourth film as director, French actress-turned-helmer Maiwenn is concerned first and foremost with her characters, […]

Read More

Cannes Film Review: ‘Beyond My Grandfather Allende’

May 17, 2015

Family members were exiled, supporters assassinated and the record expunged after Chilean president Salvador Allende was overthrown by a military coup d’etat in 1973, leaving a hole in his country’s collective memory. More than 40 years later, Marcia Tambutti A.’s natural curiosity about the grandfather she never knew serves as a unique opportunity for contemporary Chileans […]

Read More

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Wakhan Front’

May 17, 2015

For a still-young subgenre, it can feel as if the narrative possibilities of the War in Afghanistan soldier study are approaching exhaustion — until a film like Clement Cogitore’s clever, curiosity-stoking “The Wakhan Front” points out the pockets of uncanny experience that lie within it still. A portrait of tense frontline routine in which the […]

Read More